Program Planning Guide 2017/2018



Paradise eLearning Academy

Program Planning Guide

2017-2018

 

 

eLearning Staff

                                                            Director                       Kathleen Blacklock

                                                            Lead/Math Teacher        Christy Voigt

                                                            English Teacher             Anne Stearns

                                                            Counselor                     Karen Cole

                                                           

 

Board Members

                                                            President                     Bob Irvine                  

                                                            Vice President              Mary Ficcardi

                                                            Secretary                     Karen Mueller

                                                            Member at Large          Kathleen Blacklock

                                                            Member at Large          Christy Voigt

                                                            Member at Large          Stormy Lincicum        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL PROGRAM POLICIES



ENROLLMENT POLICY

 

It is the policy of the Paradise Unified School District to ensure that no student will be excluded from a course/subject because of a physical handicap, marital status, or medical condition. Students transferring in from other schools will be required to have a withdrawal form and a copy of their transcript so that they can be placed in the appropriate classes. The Guidance Office will make every reasonable effort to assist the parent/guardian in obtaining the needed information from the previous school.

The main goal of Paradise Unified School District is the graduation of every student. To provide each student with the best possible academic setting for their success, a number of alternative programs have been developed. 

Students who are transferring from alternative programs, such as the County Court School, Continuation High Schools, and Opportunity Programs, or who have been placed on Independent Study for disciplinary reasons may be referred to an alternative program within our district for enrollment. Students currently on probation will be required to have a conference with an administrator to determine if enrollment at Paradise ELearning Academy is appropriate. Students who have been expelled from another school district or are currently involved in expulsion proceedings must request a hearing before the Governing Board prior to enrollment in any PUSD school.

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Paradise eLearning Academy will issue a diploma certifying high school graduation to each student who meets the district approved course of study (minimum 220 credits) and competency requirements. Any identified special education student with an approved Individual Educational Plan (IEP) will qualify for a diploma by meeting the standards specified in their plan.

 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Courses required for graduation from Paradise eLearning Academy are established by School Board Policy and follow the Education Code of the State of California. A minimum of 220 credits are required for graduation. Transfer students must have a high school transcript that verifies the completion of required classes at an accredited institution and must meet Paradise ELearning Academy credit and course requirements. Transfer students from private religious schools will be awarded credits based on courses, which parallel those offered at Paradise ELearning Academy.

 

REPEATING A COURSE FOR A HIGHER GRADE 

A student may repeat a course in which a below average grade of "D" or "F" was earned. However, credit will not be issued twice for the same course. Credit for the first course will be counted as elective credit. The higher grade will be counted in the GPA. The transcript will show the entire record with the repeated course being designated with an "R." If a student plans to attend the University of California, the UC system will not allow a grade earned in a repeated course to be counted higher than a "C" from the 10th grade year on. In order to avoid GPA penalties affecting college admissions or scholarships, students must notify the guidance office in writing that they are repeating a course. Also a "C" or higher is necessary for college/university to consider the subject requirement as being met. 

 

STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

All education programs are available for students with special needs. Such programs and related activities will be planned and coordinated as a part of each person's Individual Education Plan (IEP), as required by state and federal law. While the inclusion of all students in existing programs is preferred, it is also recognized that in certain circumstances, specially designed programs offer the most viable educational alternative. 

 

PUSD NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

 

The Board of Education is committed to equal opportunity for all individuals in education. District programs, activities, and practices shall be free from discrimination based on race, color, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, religion, marital or parental status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, or genetic information; the perception of one or more of such characteristics; or association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics.
The Superintendent or designee shall notify students, parents/guardians, employees, employee organizations, applicants for admission and employment, and sources of referral for applicants about the District's policy on non-discrimination and related complaint procedures.

The District's Non-Discrimination Policy and related informational materials shall be published in a format that parents/guardians can understand and, when required by law, in a language other than English. Complaints alleging noncompliance with the District's policy of nondiscrimination should be directed to Michelle John, Deputy Superintendent, at the Paradise Unified School District office (6696 Clark Road, Paradise, California, 95969; 530¬-872-¬6400 ext. 225). A copy of the District's Non-Discrimination Policy is available at the District Office.

 

ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES

 

2+2+2 PROGRAM

The 2+2+2 program is a Butte College Partnership Agreement; Butte College has identified certain high school classes that are judged equivalent in scope, content and skill level to selected Butte College courses. If you complete any of these courses while in high school, you can earn college credits in advance. Currently, the following courses at Paradise Elearning Academy are articulated in the 2+2+2 program:

● Technology/Careers

To receive college credit for a 2+2+2 class a student must be enrolled in the class for a full year and receive an “A” or “B” each semester and a 70% on the final or portfolio. With proper paperwork filled out at the beginning of the class students earn one semester of college credit.

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CLASSES

 

The College Board offers exams in several college subjects each May. This is a strictly formatted and academically rigorous national testing program. The College Board charges students $93 per test. Financial assistance is available based on need. Most colleges and universities will recognize a score of 3 or better (the equivalent of a "B+" grade in a college course) for units at their institution and allow students to waive a requirement for an entry level freshman course such as U.S. History or English. Students are advised to check with the college of their choice to determine what scores are required for credit and what requirements can be met through these exams. AP classes available (depending on student interest) at Paradise ELearning Academy include Biology, Calculus, Statistics, English Language, English Literature, U.S. Government and Politics, and U.S. History. All students enrolled in AP courses are highly encouraged to take the corresponding AP examination.

 

COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS

Paradise ELearning Academy offers a Career Pathways, which prepare students for post-secondary education leading to careers in high wage, high demand and high growth industries. This Career Pathways includes a sequence of Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses that concentrate on skills for careers within a particular industry. Completed along with academic core classes that meet high school graduation requirements and college prep requirements, these courses help to prepare students for Post-secondary training.  This could include an industry recognized certificate or license, a two-year degree (A.A. or A.S.), a four-year degree (B.A. or B.S.), or graduate degree (M.A., M.S., PhD., M.D., etc.) that lead to highly skilled jobs.

CTE classes develop technical skills grounded in academics, workplace skills that increase employability, and personal skills, which lead to success in the workplace.

While giving students a taste of the working world before they graduate, these programs motivate and excite students towards a purposeful goal, increasing school engagement, reducing the dropout rate, and increasing the college attendance rate.  For more information about Career Pathways and CTE courses, visit http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ctandcapathways.org

 

CAREER PATHWAYS

 

Paradise eLearning Academy l is pleased to offer sequential courses for College and Career Readiness Pathways. Pathways consist of an introductory course, a concentration course, and a final capstone course. These concentration and capstone courses satisfy the Paradise ELearning Academy CTE graduation option. The following Career Pathways are:

 

  • BUSINESS
    Courses: Career Tech + Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance + Legal Environment of Business

 

 

 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT


Credit for concurrent enrollment (taking classes through another institution or program while enrolled at Paradise eLearning Academy) is limited to elective credit courses or for courses already taken at the high school but completed with a “D” or “F” grade. Specific graduation required courses offered by Paradise ELearning Academy must be taken at Paradise ELearning Academy for original credit. The sole exception to this rule is if the requested college course will allow the student to take advanced courses at Paradise ELearning Academy that otherwise would not have fit into their four year plan. Board Policy 614G.11(a). Colleges are not allowed to concurrently enroll high school students without prior written approval from the high school. Each college unit is worth 3.3 credits. Students taking courses from a college on a semester system will receive the following credits per unit when used for Paradise ELearning Academy graduation: 

1 unit  = 3.5 credits 2 units = 6.5 credits 
3 units = 10 credits 4 units = 13 credits 

 

CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION (CHSPE) 

This state examination is available to students who are sixteen or who are in the second semester of the tenth grade. The examination is offered by the State of California through the Butte County Office of Education. A fee is charged. Students who successfully pass the CHSPE will receive a State Certificate of Satisfactory Completion of Secondary Education. PHS diplomas are not issued to students for passing this test. The CHSPE is a certificate, not a diploma. Parent permission is required if the student wishes to withdraw from school after passing the CHSPE. WWW.CHSPE.NET 

 

COLLEGE CONNECTION (GRADE 12) 

College Connection is a self-contained, alternative high school/college partnership program located on the campus of Butte College. The key goals of the program are to assist students in developing the necessary study skills to successfully transition to college-level work and to provide students with the opportunity to take challenging courses in an enriched learning environment. As a result, many students are able to earn almost a year of college credit while still completing their high school graduation requirements. Selection for the program is competitive and limited to 35 students. However, since a full range of grade point averages are accepted, all interested students should apply. The application process for this program begins each year in December with selection of students in February. The Guidance Office has further information. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

High school credit will be accepted from an accredited college or university. The amount of credit must be agreed upon prior to enrollment in the course. All required courses must be taken at Paradise High School. There is a 20 credit limitation on this option. Advanced administrative approval of these courses is required and there is a financial cost that is incurred by the student. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH

ENGLISH 9
(Grade 9) (1 Year) (10 Credits)
Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

Core

The English 9 course is an overview of exemplar selections of literature in fiction and nonfiction genres. Students read short stories, poems, a full-length novel, and a full-length Shakespeare play, analyzing the use of elements of literature in developing character, plot, and theme. For example, in selected stories, students compare the effect of setting on tone and character development. Likewise, in the poetry unit, students analyze how artists and writers draw from and interpret source material.

Each unit includes informational texts inviting students to consider the historical, social, and literary context of the main texts they study. For example, in the first semester, a Nikolai Gogol story that is offered as an exemplar of magical realism is accompanied by instruction on that genre. Together, the lesson content and reading prompt students to demonstrate their understanding of magical realism by analyzing its qualities in a literary text.

Throughout the course, students respond to others' claims and support their own claims in essays, discussions, and presentations, consistently using thorough textual evidence. The range of texts includes canonical authors such as William Shakespeare, Franz Kafka, and Elie Wiesel, as well as writers from diverse backgrounds, such as Alice Walker, Li-Young Lee, and Robert Lake-Thom 


ENGLISH 10 Prerequisites: Eng 9
(Grade 10) (1 Year) (10 Credits)
Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

Core

The focus of the English 10 course is the writing process. Three writing applications guide the curriculum: persuasive, expository, and narrative writing. Each lesson culminates in a written assignment that lets students demonstrate their developing skill in one of these applications.

English 10 follows the model of English 9 by including at least one anchor text per lesson, but the essays, articles, stories, poems, and speeches are often presented as models for students to emulate as they practice their own writing. So that these readings may serve as proper examples for students, a high proportion of texts for this course are original pieces.

English 10 also continues to develop students' reading, listening, and speaking skills. Readings include poems, stories, speeches, plays, and a graphic novel, as well as a variety of informational texts. The readings represent a wide variety of purposes and cultural perspectives, ranging from the Indian epic The Ramayana to accounts of Hurricane Katrina told through different media. Audio and video presentations enhance students' awareness and command of rhetorical techniques and increase their understanding of writing for different audiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH II Prerequisites: Eng 9

(Grades 10) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

 

Honors

The focus of the English 10 Honors course is the writing process. Three writing applications guide the curriculum: persuasive, expository, and narrative writing. Each lesson culminates in a written assignment that lets students demonstrate their developing skill in one of these applications.

English 10 Honors follows the model of English 9 Honors by including at least one anchor text per lesson, but the essays, articles, stories, poems, and speeches are often presented as models for students to emulate as they practice their own writing. So that these readings may serve as proper examples for students, a high proportion of texts for this course are original pieces.

English 10 Honors also continues to develop students' reading, listening, and speaking skills. Readings include poems, stories, speeches, plays, and a graphic novel, as well as a variety of informational texts. The readings represent a wide variety of purposes and cultural perspectives, ranging from the Indian epic The Ramayana to accounts of Hurricane Katrina told through different media. Audio and video presentations enhance students' awareness and command of rhetorical techniques and increase their understanding of writing for different audiences.

 

 

 

ENGLISH 11   Prerequisites: Eng 10                  
(Grade 11) (1 Year) (10 Credits)
Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

Core

In the English 11 course, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. They begin by studying the language of independence and the system of government developed by Thomas Jefferson and other enlightened thinkers. Next, they explore how the Romantics and Transcendentalists emphasized the power and responsibility of the individual in both supporting and questioning the government. Students consider whether the American Dream is still achievable and examine the Modernists’ disillusionment with the idea that America is a “land of opportunity.”

Reading the words of Frederick Douglass and the text of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Students explore how individuals cope with the influence of war and cultural tensions while trying to build and secure their own personal identity. Finally, students examine how technology is affecting our contemporary experience of freedom: Will we eventually change our beliefs about what it means to be an independent human being?

In this course, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analytical essays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. In order to develop speaking and listening skills, students participate in discussions and give speeches. Overall, students gain an understanding of the way American literature represents the array of voices contributing to our multicultural identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH III Prerequisites: Eng 10

(Grade 11) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

 

Honors

In the English 11 Honors course, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. They begin by studying the language of independence and the system of government developed by Thomas Jefferson and other enlightened thinkers. Next, they explore how the Romantics and Transcendentalists emphasized the power and responsibility of the individual in both supporting and questioning the government. Students consider whether the American Dream is still achievable and examine the Modernists’ disillusionment with the idea that America is a “land of opportunity.”

Reading the words of Frederick Douglass and the text of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Students explore how individuals cope with the influence of war and cultural tensions while trying to build and secure their own personal identity. Finally, students examine how technology is affecting our contemporary experience of freedom: Will we eventually change our beliefs about what it means to be an independent human being?

In this course, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analytical essays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. In order to develop speaking and listening skills, students participate in discussions and give speeches. Overall, students gain an understanding of the way American literature represents the array of voices contributing to our multicultural identity.

 

 

ENGLISH 12   Prerequisites: Eng 11                                                                                                                                                (Grade 12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)
Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

Core

The English 12 course asks students to closely analyze British literature and world literature and consider how we humans define and interact with the unknown, the monstrous, and the heroic. In the epic poems The Odyssey, Beowulf, and The Inferno, in Shakespeare’s Tempest, in the satire of Swift, and in the rhetoric of World War II, students examine how the ideas of “heroic” and “monstrous” have been defined across cultures and time periods and how the treatment of the “other” can make monsters or heroes of us all.

Reading Frankenstein and works from those who experienced the imperialism of the British Empire, students explore the notion of inner monstrosity and consider how the dominant culture can be seen as monstrous in its ostensibly heroic goal of enlightening the world.

Throughout this course, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analytical essays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. In order to develop speaking and listening skills, students participate in discussions and give speeches. Overall, students gain an understanding of the way British and world literature represent the array of voices that contribute to our global identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AP ENGLISH
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Prerequisites
: At least a B- grade in most recent Eng courses
(Grade 11) (1 Year) (10 Credits) 
Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

Advanced Placement

In AP English Language and Composition, students investigate rhetoric and its impact on culture through analysis of notable fiction and nonfiction texts, from pamphlets to speeches to personal essays. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.

Students explore a variety of textual forms, styles, and genres. By examining all texts through a rhetorical lens, students become skilled readers and analytical thinkers. Focusing specifically on language, purpose, and audience gives them a broad view of the effect of text and its cultural role. Students write expository and narrative texts to hone the effectiveness of their own use of language, and they develop varied, informed arguments through research. Throughout the course, students are evaluated with assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the AP Exam.

AP English Language and Composition is recommended for 11th and 12th grade students. This course fulfills 11th grade requirements. Consequently, we recommend that students take only one of the following courses: English 11, Texas English III, and AP English Language and Composition.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation.

 

 

AP ENGLISH 12
ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION 
Prerequisites: At least a B- grade in most recent Eng courses
(Grade 12) (1 Year) (10 Credits) 
Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

Advanced Placement

AP English Literature and Composition immerses students in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students will read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation

 

 

 

CREATIVE WRITING Prerequisites: 10th grade English
(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement

 

Creative Writing is an English elective course that focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes one revised short story and three to five polished poems. Students draft, revise, and polish fiction and poetry through writing exercises, developing familiarity with literary terms and facility with the writing process as they study elements of creative writing.

Elements of fiction writing explored in this course include attention to specific detail, observation, character development, setting, plot, and point of view. In the poetry units, students learn about the use of sensory details and imagery, figurative language, and sound devices including rhyme, rhythm and alliteration. They also explore poetic forms ranging from found poems and slam poetry to traditional sonnets and villanelles.

In addition to applying literary craft elements in guided creative writing exercises, students engage in critical reading activities designed to emphasize the writing craft of a diverse group of authors. Students study short stories by authors such as Bharati Mukherjee and Edgar Allan Poe, learning how to create believable characters and develop setting and plot. Likewise, students read poetry by canonical greats such as W. B. Yeats and Emily Dickinson as well as contemporary writers such as Pablo Neruda, Sherman Alexie, and Alice Notley. Studying the writing technique of a range of authors provides students with models and inspiration as they develop their own voices and refine their understanding of the literary craft.

By taking a Creative Writing course, students find new approaches to reading and writing that can affect them on a personal level, as the skills they gain in each lesson directly benefit their own creative goals. Students who are already actively engaged writers and readers learn additional tools and insight into the craft of writing to help them further hone their skills and encourage their creative as well as academic growth.

All English elective content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards

 

 

 

 

ELECTIVES

 

ENGLISH FOUNDATIONS

FOUNDATIONS l

(Grades 9-12)

(1 Semester) (5 credits)

 

English Foundations I supports adolescent literacy development at the critical stage between decoding and making meaning from text. Through intensive reading and writing skills instruction, deep practice sets, consistent formative feedback, graduated reading levels, and helpful strategy tips, the course leads students to improved comprehension and text handling.

Semester 1 provides instruction in basic reading skills and vocabulary building. The student learns what a successful reader does to attack words and sentences and make meaning from them. Semester 2 provides instruction in basic writing skills, introduces academic tools, and demonstrates effective study skills. The student learns step-by-step processes for building effective paragraphs and learns how to use academic tools such as reference books and outlines. To provide additional support, the course uses text features and visual clues to draw students' attention to important information. The use of text features is also designed to help students internalize strategies for comprehending informational text.

Characters appear throughout the instruction to offer tips and fix-up strategies in an authentic, first-person, think-aloud format. Their inclusion makes transparent the reading processes that go on inside the mind of a successful reader. This extra metacognitive support serves to bolster student confidence and provide a model of process and perseverance.

Numerous practice opportunities are provided in the form of assessments that move from no stakes to low stakes to high stakes throughout a unit. This practice is centered on authentic and age-appropriate passages that are written in a topical framework and use controlled syntax and vocabulary. The difficulty of these passages gradually increases from a 3rd- to 5th grade reading level over the duration of the course. Additional support is offered through significant formative feedback in practice and assessment.

This course guides students through the reading, writing, and basic academic skills needed to prepare for success in academic coursework. At the end of the course, the student should be poised for continued success in the academic world. The content is based on extensive national and state standards research and consultation with reading specialists and classroom teachers.

It aligns to state standards for reading and writing and to NCTE/IRA reading and writing standards

FOUNDATIONS ll

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 credits)

 

English Foundations II offers a year of skill building and strategy development in reading and writing. Semester one is a reading program designed to help struggling readers develop mastery in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy. Semester two is a writing program which builds confidence in composition fundamentals by focusing on the areas of composing, grammar, style, and media literacy. Both semesters are structured around ten mini-units which offer interactive instruction and guided practice in each of the four learning strands. Students read for a variety of purposes and write for a variety of audiences. The workshops stress high interest, engaging use of technology, relevant topics, and robustly scaffold practice. Students learn to use different types of graphic organizers as they develop and internalize reading and writing process strategies. They build confidence as they develop skills and experience success on numerous low stakes assessments that encourage growth and reinforce learning.

The reading program content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), International Reading Association (IRA), National Reading Program (NRP), and McREL, standards and aligned to state standards.

The writing program is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and aligned to state standards

 

 

 

 

MEDIA LITERACY   Prerequisites: 10th grade English

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 credits)

 

Media Literacy teaches students how to build the critical thinking, writing, and reading skills required in a media-rich and increasingly techno-centric world. In a world saturated with media messages, digital environments, and social networking, concepts of literacy must expand to include all forms of Prerequisites media. Today's students need to be able to read, comprehend, analyze, and respond to non-traditional media with the same skill level they engage with traditional print sources.

A major topic in Media Literacy is non-traditional media reading skills, including how to approach, analyze, and respond to advertisements, blogs, websites, social media, news media, and wikis. Students also engage in a variety of writing activities in non-traditional media genres, such as blogging and podcast scripting.

Students consider their own positions as consumers of media and explore ways to use non-traditional media to become more active and thoughtful citizens. Students learn how to ask critical questions about the intended audience and underlying purpose of media messages, and study factors which can contribute to bias and affect credibility.

The course content is based on The National Association for Media Literacy Education's Core Principles of Media Literacy Education, as well as aggregate state standards and research into best pedagogical practices.

 

READING SKILLS AND STRATEGIES                                                                                                                                   (Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

                                                                                                                                                                                     Reading Skills and Strategies is a course is designed to help the struggling reader develop mastery in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy, which are the course's primary content strands. Using these strands, the course guides the student through the skills necessary to be successful in the academic world and beyond. The reading comprehension strand focuses on introducing the student to the varied purposes of reading (e.g., for entertainment, for information, to complete a task, or to analyze). In the vocabulary strand, the student learns specific strategies for understanding and remembering new vocabulary. In the study skills strand, the student learns effective study and test-taking strategies. In the media literacy strand, the student learns to recognize and evaluate persuasive techniques, purposes, design choices, and effects of media. The course encourages personal enjoyment in reading with 10 interviews featuring the book choices and reading adventures of students and members of the community.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and aligned to state standards

 

 

WRITING SKILLS AND STRATEGIES                                                                                                                                                  (Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)         

                                                                                                                                                                                        Writing Skills and Strategies develops key language arts skills necessary for high school graduation and success on high stakes exams through a semester of interactive instruction and guided practice in composition fundamentals. The course is divided into ten mini-units of study. The first two units are designed to build early success and confidence, orienting students to the writing process and to sentence and paragraph essentials through a series of low-stress, high-interest hook activities. In subsequent units, students review, practice, compose and submit one piece of writing. Four key learning strands are integrated throughout: composition practice, grammar skill building, diction and style awareness, and media and technology exploration. Guided studies emphasize the structure of essential forms of writing encountered in school, in life, and in the work place. Practice in these forms is scaffold to accommodate learners at different skill levels.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and aligned to state standards

 

 

 

 

 

 

MATHEMATICS

ALGEBRA I COMMON CORE Prerequisites: Introductory or Pre-Algebra                                                                                                                                                                                              (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                 Meets a-g UC/CSU requirement   

Core                                                                                                                                                                                 Algebra I builds students' command of linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include problem-solving with basic equations and formulas; measurement; an introduction to functions and problem solving; linear equations and systems of linear equations; exponents and exponential functions; sequences and functions; descriptive statistics; polynomials and factoring; quadratic equations and functions; and function transformations and inverses.

This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply Common Core's eight mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them. Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

 

GEOMETRY COMMON CORE Prerequisites: Algebra I                                                                                                                                              (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                   Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements       

 

Core                                                                                                                 

Geometry builds upon students' command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of sound mathematical arguments; points, lines, and angles; triangles and trigonometry; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; congruence, similarity, transformations, and constructions; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; and applications of probability.

This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply Common Core's eight mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them. Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALGEBRA ll COMMON CORE Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry                                                                                                                                                (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                  Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements    

Core                                                                                                                                                                                Algebra II introduces students to advanced functions, with a focus on developing a strong conceptual grasp of the expressions that define them. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include quadratic equations; polynomial functions; rational expressions and equations; radical expressions and equations; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric identities and functions; modeling with functions; probability and inferential statistics; probability distributions; and sample distributions and confidence intervals.

This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply Common Core's eight mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them. Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.

 

MATHEMATICS l COMMON CORE  Prerequisites: Introductory or Pre-Algebra                                                                                                                                                                                                 (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                                                                       Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

Core

Mathematics I builds students' command of geometric knowledge and linear and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include relationships between quantities; linear and exponential relationships; reasoning with equations; descriptive statistics; congruence, proof, and constructions; and connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates.

This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply Common Core's eight mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them. Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.

 

 

 

MATHMATICS ll COMMON CORE Prerequisites: Math I                                                                                                                                                                              (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                                                                        Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements              

Core

Mathematics II extends students' geometric knowledge and introduces them to quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, exploring the relationship between these and their linear and exponential counterparts. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include extending the number system; quadratic functions and modeling; expressions and equations; applications of probability; similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and proof; and circles with and without coordinates.

This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply Common Core's eight mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them. Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.

 

MATHEMATICS lll COMMON CORE   Prerequisites: Math II                                                                                                                                               (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                                                               Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements               

Core

Mathematics III incorporates advanced functions, trigonometry, and probability and statistics as students synthesize their prior knowledge and solve increasingly challenging problems. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include formulating inferences and conclusions from data; polynomial, rational, and radical relationships; trigonometry of general triangles and trigonometric functions; and mathematical modeling.

This course supports all students as they simultaneously develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply Common Core's eight mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them. Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

 

 

 

PRE-CALCULUS  Prerequisites: Successful completion of two years of algebra and one year of geometry                                                                             (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                                                               Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements               

Core

Course materials required. See 'Course Materials' below.

Pre-calculus is a course that combines reviews of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.

Within each Pre-calculus lesson, students are supplied with a post-study Checkup activity that provides them the opportunity to hone their computational skills by working through a low-stakes problem set before moving on to formal assessment. Unit-level Pre-calculus assessments include a computer-scored test and a scaffold

, teacher-scored test.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

AP CALCULUS AB   Prerequisites: Algebra II, Geometry, Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry                                                          (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                 Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

                                                                                                                                                                                   In AP Calculus AB, students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. The equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course, AP Calculus AB prepares students for the AP exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation

 

 

PRE-CALCULUS HONORS   Prerequisites: Successful completion of two years of algebra and one year of geometry                                           

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                                                                Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements       

 

Pre-calculus is a comprehensive course that weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.

Within each Pre-calculus lesson, students are supplied with a post-study Checkup activity that provides them the opportunity to hone their computational skills in a low-stakes problem set before moving on to formal assessment. Additionally, connections are made throughout the Pre-calculus course to calculus, art, history, and a variety of other fields related to mathematics.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

 

AP STATISTICS   Prerequisites: Algebra II or Math Analysis                                                                                                  (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                              Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

                                                                                                                                                                                   AP Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. They will learn to effectively design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating real research examples taken from daily life. The next time they hear the results of a poll or study, they will know whether the results are valid. As the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties, statistics plays an important role in many fields. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP Statistics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business.

This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation

 

 

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 

(Grades 9-12) 1 semester (5 credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

Core

Probability and Statistics provides a curriculum focused on understanding key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications. Through a "Discovery-Confirmation-Practice"-based exploration of each concept, students are challenged to work toward a mastery of computational skills, deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Course topics include types of data; common methods used to collect data; and the various representations of data, including histograms, bar graphs, box plots, and scatterplots. Students learn to work with data by analyzing and employing methods of prediction, specifically involving samples and populations, distributions, summary statistics, regression analysis, transformations, simulations, and inference.

Ideas involving probability — including sample space, empirical and theoretical probability, expected value, and independent and compound events — are covered as students explore the relationship between probability and data analysis. The basic connection between geometry and probability is also explored.

To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Probability and Statistics includes audio resources in English.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

GEOMETRY     Prerequisites: Algebra I                                                                                                               

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                            Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core                                                                                                                                                                 Geometry builds upon students' command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of sound mathematical arguments; points, lines, and angles; triangles and trigonometry; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; congruence, similarity, transformations, and constructions; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; and applications of probability.

This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency and deepen conceptual understanding. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them

 

MATH ELECTIVES

 

MATH FOUNDATIONS I                                                                                                                                                             (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)         

Math Foundations I offers a structured remediation solution based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points and is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 3rd- to 5th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation for students in grades 6 to 12. When used in combination, Math Foundations I and Math Foundations II (covering grades 6 to 8) effectively remediate computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school–level math courses with confidence.

Math Foundations I empowers students to progress at their optimum pace through over 80 semester hours of interactive instruction and assessment spanning 3rd- to 5th-grade math skills. Carefully paced, guided instruction is accompanied by interactive practice that is engaging and accessible. Formative assessments help students to understand areas of weakness and improve performance, while summative assessments chart progress and skill development. Early in the course, students develop general strategies for honing their problem-solving skills. Subsequent units provide a problem-solving strand that asks students to practice applying specific math skills to a variety of real-world contexts.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Math (NCTM) April 2006 publication, Curricular Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Quest for Coherence, and is aligned with state standards.

 

MATH FOUNDATIONS ll                                                                                                                                                           (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

           

Based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points, Math Foundations II is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 6th- to 8th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as middle school curriculum. The program simultaneously builds the computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school-level math courses with confidence.

The course's carefully paced, guided instruction is accompanied by interactive practice that is engaging and accessible. Formative assessments help students to understand areas of weakness and improve performance, while summative assessments chart progress and skill development. Early in the course, students develop general strategies for honing their problem-solving skills. Subsequent units provide a problem-solving strand that asks students to practice applying specific math skills to a variety of real-world contexts.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Math (NCTM) April 2006 publication, Curricular Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Quest for Coherence, and is aligned with state standards.

FINANCIAL LITERACY Prerequisites: Introductory Algebra or equivalent

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Financial Literacy helps students recognize and develop vital skills that connect life and career goals with personalized strategies and milestone-based action plans. Students explore concepts and work toward a mastery of personal finance skills, deepening their understanding of key ideas and extending their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Course topics include career planning; income, taxation, and budgeting; savings accounts, checking accounts, and electronic banking; interest, investments, and stocks; cash, debit, credit, and credit scores; insurance; and consumer advice on how to buy, rent, or lease a car or house.

These topics are solidly supported by writing and discussion activities. Journal activities provide opportunities for students to both apply concepts on a personal scale and analyze scenarios from a third-party perspective. Discussions help students network with one another by sharing personal strategies and goals and recognizing the diversity of life and career plans within a group.

To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Financial Literacy includes audio resources in English.

This course is aligned with state standards as they apply to Financial Literacy and adheres to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) Problem Solving, Communication, Reasoning, and Mathematical Connections Process standards.

 

 

MATHEMATICS OF PERSONAL FINANCE   Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry or their equivalents

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Mathematics of Personal Finance focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra I and Geometry to topics including personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning.

Students then extend their investigations using more advanced mathematics, such as systems of equations (when studying cost and profit issues) and exponential functions (when calculating interest problems). To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Mathematics of Personal Finance includes audio resources in both Spanish and English.

This course is aligned with state standards as they apply to Mathematics of Personal Finance and adheres to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) Problem Solving, Communication, Reasoning, and Mathematical Connections Process standards.

 

 

 

 

 

LABORATORY SCIENCE

 

AP BIOLOGY Prerequisites: Biology

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

AP Biology builds students' understanding of biology on both the micro and macro scales. After studying cell biology, students move on to understand how evolution drives the diversity and unity of life. Students will examine how living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information and how organisms utilize free energy. The equivalent of an introductory college-level biology course, AP Biology prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, or engineering.

The AP Biology course provides a learning experience focused on allowing students to develop their critical thinking skills and cognitive strategies. Frequent no- and low-stakes assessments allow students to measure their comprehension and improve their performance as they progress through each activity. Students regularly engage with primary sources, allowing them to practice the critical reading and analysis skills that they will need in order to pass the AP exam and succeed in a college biology course. Students perform hands-on labs that give them insight into the nature of science and help them understand biological concepts, as well as how evidence can be obtained to support those concepts. Students also complete several virtual lab studies in which they form hypotheses; collect, analyze, and manipulate data; and report their findings and conclusions.  During both virtual and traditional lab investigations and research opportunities, students summarize their findings and analyze others' findings in summaries, using statistical and mathematical calculations when appropriate. Summative tests are offered at the end of each unit as well as at the end of each semester, and contain objective and constructed response items. Robust scaffolding, rigorous instruction, relevant material and regular active learning opportunities ensure that students can achieve mastery of the skills necessary to excel on the AP exam. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIOLOGY

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment.

The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts.

Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

The content is based on the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

 

BIOLOGY CORE HONORS

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Biology is an in-depth course that furthers mastery of scientific skills, fosters a deep understanding of key concepts, and promotes the application of the scientific method to biological topics.

The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology.

Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

Biology students are frequently asked to respond to scientific problems and issues via written assignments. Moreover, Exploration activities challenge Honors students to deconstruct scientific claims, analyze scientific articles, and suggest follow-up experiments or topics for further research.

The content is based on the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY   Prerequisites: middle school/junior high Physical Science

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core                      

Chemistry offers a curriculum that emphasizes students' understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology.

The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, the importance of chemistry to society, atomic structure, bonding in matter, chemical reactions, redox reactions, electrochemistry, phases of matter, equilibrium and kinetics, acids and bases, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, nuclear reactions, organic chemistry, and alternative energy.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how chemistry concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply learned concepts and practice their writing skills.

The content is based on the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061 benchmarks and the National Science Education Standards and is aligned with state standards

 

 

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY CORE HONORS   Prerequisites: Middle school Junior High physical science, and one year of algebra

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/USC requirement

 

Chemistry offers a curriculum that emphasizes students' understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology.

The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, the importance of chemistry to society, atomic structure, bonding in matter, chemical reactions, redox reactions, electrochemistry, phases of matter, equilibrium and kinetics, acids and bases, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, nuclear reactions, organic chemistry, and alternative energy.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how chemistry concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply learned concepts and practice their writing skills. Exploration activities challenge students to deconstruct scientific claims, analyze scientific articles, and suggest follow-up experiments or topics for further research.

The content is based on the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061 benchmarks and the National Science Education Standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AP CHEMISTRY   Prerequisites: Chemistry

(Grades 10-12) (2 semesters) (10 credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

AP Chemistry builds students' understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying chemical reactions and electrochemistry, students move on to understand how the chemical and physical properties of materials can be explained by the structure and arrangements of the molecules and the forces between those molecules. Students will examine the laws of thermodynamics, molecular collisions, and the reorganization of matter in order to understand how changes in matter take place. Finally, students will explore chemical equilibria, including acid-base equilibria. The equivalent of an introductory college-level chemistry course, AP Chemistry prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, or engineering.

The AP Chemistry course provides a learning experience focused on allowing students to develop their critical thinking skills and cognitive strategies. Frequent no- and low-stakes assessments allow students to measure their comprehension and improve their performance as they progress through each activity. Students regularly engage with primary source materials, allowing them to practice the critical reading and analysis skills that they will need in order to pass the AP exam and succeed in a college chemistry course. Students perform hands-on labs that give them insight into the nature of science and help them understand chemical concepts, as well as how evidence can be obtained to support those concepts. Students also complete several virtual lab studies in which they form hypotheses; collect, analyze, and manipulate data; and report their findings and conclusions. During both virtual and traditional lab investigations and research opportunities, students summarize their findings and analyze others' findings in summaries, using statistical and mathematical calculations when appropriate. Summative tests are offered at the end of each unit as well as at the end of each semester, and contain objective and constructed response items. Robust scaffolding, rigorous instruction, relevant material, and regular active learning opportunities ensure that students can achieve mastery of the skills necessary to excel on the AP exam.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHYSICS Prerequisites: Middle School/Junior High Physics and one year of Algebra (two years recommended)

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Physics offers a curriculum that emphasizes students' understanding of fundamental physics concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology.

The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions.  Topics include the nature of science, math for physics, energy, kinematics, force and motion, momentum, gravitation, chemistry for physics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, nuclear physics, quantum physics, and cosmology.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts.  Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how physics concepts are applied in technology and engineering.  Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply learned concepts and practice their writing skills.

The content is based on the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061 benchmarks and the National Science Education Standards and is aligned with state standards

 

 

 

 

PHYSICS CORE HONORS   Prerequisites: Middle School/Junior High Physics and one year of Algebra (two years recommended)

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Physics offers a curriculum that emphasizes students' understanding of fundamental physics concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology.

The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, math for physics, energy, kinematics, force and motion, momentum, gravitation, chemistry for physics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, nuclear physics, quantum physics, and cosmology.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how physics concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities to apply learned concepts and practice their writing skills.

Exploration activities challenge students to deconstruct scientific claims, analyze scientific articles, and suggest follow-up experiments or topics for further research.

The content is based on the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061 benchmarks and the National Science Education Standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCIENCE

 

 

AP PSYCHOLOGY   Prerequisites: Biology

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

AP Psychology provides an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. Students will explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They will study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Along the way, students will also investigate relevant concepts like study skills and information retention. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey course, AP Psychology prepares students for the AP exam and for further studies in psychology or life sciences.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation

 

 

 

 

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Psychology provides a solid overview of the field's major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior.

By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters around challenge questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction.

The content is based on the American Psychological Association's National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula. The teaching methods draw from the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) teaching standards.

 

 

EARTH SCIENCE

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

 

Core

Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth's composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, freshwater, and oceans; and its environment in space.

Course topics include an exploration of the major cycles that affect every aspect of life, including weather, climate, air movement, tectonics, volcanic eruptions, rocks, minerals, geologic history, Earth's environment, sustainability, and energy resources. Optional teacher-scored labs encourage students to apply the scientific method.

The content is based on the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

 

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

 

Core

Physical Science offers a focused curriculum designed around the understanding of critical physical science concepts, including the nature and structure of matter, the characteristics of energy, and the mastery of critical scientific skills.

Course topics include an introduction to kinematics, including gravity and two-dimensional motion; force; momentum; waves; electricity; atoms; the periodic table of elements; molecular bonding; chemical reactivity; gases; and an introduction to nuclear energy. Teacher-scored labs encourage students to apply the scientific method.

The content is based on the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards and is aligned with state standards.

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Core

Environmental Science explores the biological, physical, and sociological principles related to the environment in which organisms live on Earth, the biosphere. Course topics include natural systems on Earth, biogeochemical cycles, the nature of matter and energy, the flow of matter and energy through living systems, populations, communities, ecosystems, ecological pyramids, renewable and non-renewable natural resources, land use, biodiversity, pollution, conservation, sustainability, and human impacts on the environment.

The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, deconstruct claims, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Case studies of current environmental challenges introduce each content lesson and acquaint students with real-life environmental issues, debates, and solutions. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Virtual Lab activities enable students to engage in investigations that require long periods of observation at remote locations and to explore simulations that enable environmental scientists to test predictions. Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how biology, earth science, and physical science are applied to the study of the environment and how technology and engineering are contributing solutions for studying and creating a sustainable biosphere.

The content is specifically aligned to state standards and the NGSS standards for life science, earth science, physical science, and engineering, technology, and society.

 

 

SCIENCE ELECTIVES

SCIENCE FOUNDATIONS   Prerequisites: Middle school/Junior high Physical science

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

 

Foundations

Science Foundations provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and strategies necessary for success in rigorous high school science courses. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as a bridge to high school.

Science Foundations is a two-semester course, with each semester containing 10 mini-units. Each mini-unit is composed of three lessons. The first lesson focuses on key concepts found in Earth science, physical science, and life science. The second lesson reinforces reading and math skills students need to be successful with the content introduced in the first lesson. The third lesson introduces scientific inquiry and critical thinking skills that will help students thrive in science as well as other disciplines. Carefully paced, guided instruction is accompanied by engaging and accessible interactive practice. Checkup activities provide an opportunity to review content prior to assessment. Practice activities offer an opportunity to apply concepts that were presented in Study activities.

The course is based on the National Science Education Standards (NSES) for middle school science.

 

HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS   Prerequisites: U.S. History

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

AP U.S. Government and Politics studies the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students will gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Along the way, they'll learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. They'll also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze the specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP U.S. Government and Politics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation.

 

 

 

AP U. S. HISTORY

(Grades 9-12) (2 Semester) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

In AP U.S. History, students investigate the development of American economics, politics, and culture through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, research, and writing. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP U.S. History prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in history, political science, economics, sociology, and law.

Through the examination of historical themes and the application of historical thinking skills, students learn to connect specific people, places, events, and ideas to the larger trends of U.S. history. Critical-reading activities, feedback-rich instruction, and application-oriented assignments hone students' ability to reason chronologically, to interpret historical sources, and to construct well-supported historical arguments. Students write throughout the course, responding to primary and secondary sources through journal entries, essays, and visual presentations of historical content. In discussion activities, students respond to the positions of others while staking and defending claims of their own. Robust scaffolding, rigorous instruction, relevant material, and regular opportunities for active learning ensure that students can achieve mastery of the skills necessary to excel on the AP exam.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation

 

 

U.S. HISTORY

(Grades 9-12) (2 semesters) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

U.S. History traces the nation’s history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Students learn about the Native American, European, and African people who lived in America before it became the United States. They examine the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system. Students investigate the economic, cultural, and social motives for the nation’s expansion, as well as the conflicting notions of liberty that eventually resulted in civil war. The course describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation and then focuses on its role in modern world affairs.

Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the “information revolution” affect the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups.

The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationship. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities.

The content is based on standards rom the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

 

                                              

U.S. HISTORY SINCE THE CIVIL WAR

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

This course traces the nation's history from the end of the Civil War to the present. It describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation, highlighting social policy as well as its role in modern world affairs.

Students evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while also exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the "information revolution" affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups.

The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationships. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

 

 

U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS   Prerequisites: U.S. History is recommended, but not required

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

U.S. Government and Politics offers a tightly focused and scaffold curriculum that uses the perspective of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government. Beginning with basic theories of government, moving to the Declaration of Independence, and continuing to the present day, the course explores the relationship between individual Americans and the governing bodies. It covers the political culture of the country and gains insight into the challenges faced by presidents, congressional representatives, and other political activists. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court.

U.S. Government and Politics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffold series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. Students read annotated primary documents and apply those documents to the course content.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

 

WORLD HISTORY SINCE THE RENAISSANCE

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

In World History, students learn to see the world today as a product of a process that began thousands of years ago when humans became a speaking, travelling, and trading species.  Through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, case studies, and research, students investigate the continuity and change of human culture, governments, economic systems, and social structures.  

Students build and practice historical thinking skills, learning to connect specific people, places, events and ideas to the larger trends of world history. In critical reading activities, feedback-rich instruction, and application-oriented assignments, students develop their capacity to reason chronologically, interpret and synthesize sources, identify connections between ideas, and develop well-supported historical arguments.  Students write throughout the course, responding to primary sources and historical narratives through journal entries, essays and visual presentations of social studies content.  In discussion activities, students respond to the position of others while staking and defending their own claim.  The course's rigorous instruction is supported with relevant materials and active learning opportunities to ensure students at all levels can master the key historical thinking skills.
This course is aligned to state standards and the Common Core State Standards for Literacy in Social Studies.

 

 

U.S. AND GLOBAL ECONOMICS   Prerequisites: U.S. Government and Politics is recommended, but not required

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

U.S. and Global Economics offers a tightly focused and scaffold curriculum that provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East.

U.S. and Global Economics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffold series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. They also apply basic mathematics to economic concepts. Students read selections from annotated primary documents and apply those readings to the course content.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

 

 

AP MACROECONOMICS   Prerequisites: Algebra II (or Math Analysis)

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

AP Macroeconomics students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. They'll also examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect people, and how those factors can impact everyone's life through employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. The equivalent of a 100-level college-level class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, political science and history.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation.

 

 

 

 

 

AP MICROECONOMICS   Prerequisites: Algebra I

(Grades 9-12) 1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

AP Microeconomics studies the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. They'll also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Microeconomics studies the economic way of thinking, understanding the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy. The equivalent of a 100-level college course, AP Microeconomics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.

This course has been authorized by the College Board® to use the AP designation.

 

 

 

 

 

MULTICULTURAL STUDIES

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Multicultural Studies is a one-semester elective history and sociology course that examines the United States as a multicultural nation. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences .Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures .In online Discussions and Polls, students reflect critically on their own experiences as well as those of others. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students can respond using methods of inquiry from history, sociology, and psychology. Written assignments and Journals provide opportunities for students to practice and develop skills for thinking and communicating about race, culture, ethnicity, and identity. The content and skill focus of this interdisciplinary course is based on the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Expectations of Excellence: Curriculum Standards for Social Studies as well as the National Standards for History published by the National Center for History in Schools (NCHS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES

 

SOCIOLOGY

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Sociology examines why people think and behave as they do in relationships, groups, institutions, and societies.

Major course topics include individual and group identity, social structures and institutions, social change, social stratification, social dynamics in recent and current events, the effects of social change on individuals, and the research methods used by social scientists.

In online discussions and polls, students reflect critically on their own experiences and ideas, as well as on the ideas of sociologists. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students can respond, using methods of inquiry from sociology. Written assignments provide opportunities to practice and develop skills in thinking and communicating about human relationships, individual and group identity, and all other major course topics.

The course content is based on the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Expectations of Excellence: Curriculum Standards for Social Studies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GEOGRAPHY AND WORLD CULTURES

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Geography and World Cultures offers a tightly focused and scaffold curriculum that enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. Along the way, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read maps, charts, and graphs, and how to create them.

Geography and World Cultures is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

Geography and World Cultures is designed as the first course in the social studies sequence. It develops note-taking skills, teaches the basic elements of analytic writing, and introduces students to the close examination of primary documents

                                                           

 

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

 

FRENCH l

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

French I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as sports, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the verb system, adjective agreement, formal and informal address, reflexive verbs, and past tense. Students also gain an understanding of the cultures of French-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe, as well as insight into Francophone culture and people.

The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.

The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

 

 

FRENCH II Prerequisites: French I or the equivalent

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

Core

French II teaches students to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal address. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms in cooking, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes present- and past-tense verb forms and uses, negation, and direct and indirect objects. Students deepen their knowledge of French-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.

The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.

The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

 

SPANISH l                                                                                                                                                                    (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                        Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

Core

Spanish I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe.

The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.

The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

 

SPANISH II Prerequisites: Spanish I or the equivalent                                                                                                       (Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)                                                                                                                                  Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements         

Core

Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal situations. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.

The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.

The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

 

SPANISH III Prerequisites: Spanish I and II (or equivalent)

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

In Spanish III, students build upon the skills and knowledge they acquired in Spanish I and II.  The course presents new vocabulary and grammatical concepts in context while providing students with ample opportunities to review and expand upon the material they have learned previously.

Students read and listen to authentic materials from newspapers, magazines, and television.  The content is focused on contemporary and relevant topics such as urbanization and population growth in Latin American countries, global health concerns, jobs of the future, and scientific advancements.  The materials engage students as they improve their command of Spanish.

Students review the formation and use of regular and irregular verbs in the present and future tenses, as well as the use of reflexive particles and infinitives.  They also expand their understanding of noun and adjective agreement, the comparative and superlative degree of adjectives, and the placement and use of direct and indirect objects and pronouns.  Students expand their vocabulary through exposure to word roots and families, popular slang, the correct use of words that are often confused for one another, and review of concepts such as proper placement of accents and stress.

Presentation of new materials is always followed by several interactive, online exercises, allowing students to master the material as they learn it.  Teacher-scored activities provide students with opportunities to use their new Spanish skills both orally and in writing.  Discussion activities allow students to interact with their peers in the target language.

The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

 

 

OTHER

 

COLLEGE AND CAREER PREPARATION I

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

High school students have many questions about the college application process, what it takes to be a successful college student, and how to begin thinking about their careers.  

In College and Career Preparation I, students obtain a deeper understanding of what it means to be ready for college. Students are informed about the importance of high school performance in college admissions and how to prepare for college testing. They know the types of schools and degrees they may choose to pursue after high school and gain wide exposure to the financial resources available that make college attainable.

Career readiness is also a focus. Students connect the link between interests, college majors, and future careers by analyzing career clusters. Students come away from this course understanding how smart preparation and skill development in high school can lead into expansive career opportunities after they have completed their education and are ready for the working world.

Students who complete College and Career Preparation I have the basic skills and foundation of knowledge to progress into College and Career Preparation II, the capstone course that provides hands-on information about the transition from high school to college and career.

The course is based on the American School Counselors Association National Standards for school counseling programs.

 

 

 

 

COLLEGE AND CAREER PREPARATION II Prerequisites: College and Career Preparation I

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

High school students have many questions about the college application process, what it takes to be a successful college student, and how to begin thinking about their careers.  

College and Career Preparation II builds on the lessons and skills in College and Career Preparation I. The course provides a step-by-step guide to choosing a college. It walks students through the process of filling out an application, including opportunities to practice, and takes an in-depth look at the various college-admission tests and assessments, as well financial aid options.

College and Career Preparation II also instructs students in interviewing techniques and provides career guidance. Students explore valuable opportunities such as job shadowing and internships when preparing for a career.   

Students who complete this course obtain a deeper understanding of college and career readiness through informative, interactive critical thinking and analysis activities while sharpening their time management, organization, and learning skills that they learned in College and Career Preparation I.

College and Career Preparation II prepares students with the knowledge and skills to be successful in college and beyond.

The course is based on the American School Counselors Association National Standards for school counseling programs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ART APPRECIATION

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. Students then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students continue their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course's primary focus, students will finish the course by studying artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.

Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists that represent a variety of geographic locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about art critique to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art.

Art Appreciation is based on national standards developed by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations, as well as key state standards. It encompasses a variety of skills to enable students to critique, compare, and perhaps influence their own works of art.

 

 

 

MUSIC APPRECIATION

(Grades 9-12) (1 Year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Music Appreciation is a streamlined course that introduces student to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples, through the classical to the most contemporary in the world at large. The course is offered in a two-semester format: The first semester covers primitive musical forms, classical music, and American jazz. The second semester presents the rich modern traditions, including: gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop.

The course explores the interface of music and social movements and examines how the emergent global society and the Internet is bringing musical forms together in new ways from all around the world.

 

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

Physical Education combines the best of online instruction with actual student participation in weekly cardiovascular, aerobic, and muscle toning activities. The course promotes a keen understanding of the value of physical fitness and aims to motivate students to participate in physical activities throughout their lives.

Specific areas of study include: Cardiovascular exercise and care, safe exercising, building muscle strength and endurance, injury prevention, fitness skills and FITT benchmarks, goal setting, nutrition and diet (vitamins and minerals, food labels, evaluation product claims), and stress management. The course requires routine participation in adult-supervised physical activities. Successful completion of this course will require parent/legal guardian sign-off on student-selected physical activities and on weekly participation reports to verify the student is meeting his or her requirements and responsibilities.

Physical Education is aligned to national and state standards and the Presidential Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

 

 

HEALTH

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

Health is a valuable, skills-based health education course designed for general education in grades 9 through 12. Health helps students develop knowledge, attitudes, and essential skills in a variety of health-related subjects, including mental and emotional health, social health, nutrition, physical fitness, substance use and abuse, disease prevention and treatment, and injury prevention and safety.

Through use of accessible information, realistic interactivities, and project-based learning, students apply the skills they need to stay healthy. These skills include identifying and accessing valid health information, practicing self-management, identifying internal and external influences, communicating effectively, making healthy decisions, setting goals, and advocating. Students who complete Health build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.

The content is based on the National Health Standards (SHAPE) and is aligned to state standards.

 

PRINICPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE

(Grades 9-12) (2 Semesters) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Principles of Health Science provides knowledge and skills students need for careers in health care. Students explore the services, structure, and professions of the health care system and get guidance on choosing a specific career path in health services, including career paths in emergency medicine, nutrition, and alternative medicine.

Students focus on day-to-day skills and expectations for health professionals, which include promoting wellness, maintaining a safe environment, creating medical records, and practicing good communication, collaboration, and leadership. In addition, students will expand their understanding of health and safety systems, how to address emergency situations, and deal with infection control issues. Students will also explore topics in medical science, terminology, procedures, and regulations - including an overview of physiology and medical measurements.

Using real-life scenarios and application-driven activities, students learn the responsibilities and challenges of being health care professionals and deepen their knowledge of various career options. In addition to building their understanding of technical concepts and skills, students evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers and develop personal career plans to pursue work in the health care industry and extend their knowledge of oral and written communication in health science.

Principles of Health Science is a full-year Career and Technical Education course for programs of study in health sciences. This course is aligned with state and national standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY/CAREER EDUCATION

(Grade 9) (1 year) (10 Credits) 

Required for all 9th grade students.
College credit available under the 2+2+2 program
This course meets the Computer Literacy graduation requirements upon full year completion. 
This is a beginning computer course that integrates career exploration. Upon completion of this course, students will gain an understanding of today’s technology in their academic, personal and career lives. Students will learn and use correct keyboarding technique to touch type, emphasizing the development of speed and accuracy. Keyboarding skills will be used for letters, reports, and other materials used in health and career curriculum. Computer applications within the course include using Microsoft Office for word processing, spreadsheet, presentations, desktop publishing, and web design. In addition, Internet information retrieval and the editing of photos and graphics are also introduced. Students will become familiar with computer terminology and equipment.  

 

 

 

 

 

BUSINESS APPLICATIONS

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

Business Applications prepares students to succeed in the workplace. Students begin by establishing an awareness of the roles essential to an organization's success, and then work to develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills. In doing so, students gain proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software.

This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create, analyze, and critique reports, letters, project plans, presentations, and other professional communications. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them.

Business Applications is an introductory level Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in business, management, and administration; information technology; and other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course can go on to obtain the Microsoft® Office Specialist: Microsoft® Office Word certification.

 

 

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND FINANCE

(Grades 9-12) (1 year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

 

Core

Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance provides the knowledge and skills students need for careers in business and marketing.  Students begin exploring roles and functions that business and marketing play in a global society, develop an understanding of the market place, as well as understanding product placement and promotion.

Students analyze the impact of government, legal systems, and organized labor on business; develop an understanding of business communications and management; and explore legal, ethical, and financial issues in business and marketing. Furthermore, students delve into basic economic concepts including personal finance, economic systems, cost-profit relationships, and economic indicators and trends.

Using hands-on activities, students reinforce, apply and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant real-world inspired scenarios. This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills around marketing, pricing, distribution and management, while also focusing on economics and interpersonal skills. This course also addresses exploring career options in business and marketing as well as securing and keeping a job.

Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance is a full-year Career and Technical course for programs of study in Business Administration and Management. This course is aligned with state and national standards.

 

 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS

(Grades 9-12) (1 Semester) (5 Credits)

 

Core

Information Technology Applications prepares students to work in the field of Information Technology. Students will be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study of computer hardware, operating systems, networking, the Internet, web publishing, spreadsheets and database software. Through a series of hand-on activities, students will learn what to expect in the field of Information Technology and begin exploring career options in the field.

Information Technology Applications is an introductory level Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in information technology as well as other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue the Microsoft® Office Specialist certifications in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access, as well as IC3 certification

 

 

PRINCIPALS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

(Grades 9-12) (1 year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Principles of Information Technology prepares students to succeed in the workplace. Students begin by establishing an awareness of the roles essential to an organization's success, and then work to develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills. In doing so, students gain proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software. Students will also be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study of computer hardware, operating systems, networking, the Internet, web publishing, spreadsheets and database software.

This course allows students to explore careers in information technology and business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create, analyze, and critique reports, letters, project plans, presentations, and other professional communications. Students will learn what to expect in the field of Information Technology and begin exploring career options in the field. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them.

Principles of Information Technology is a full-year introductory Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in business, management, and administration; information technology; and other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue the Microsoft® Office Specialist certifications in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access*, as well as IC3 certification.

 

 

PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE

(Grades 9-12) (1 year) (10 Credits)

Meets a-g UC/CSU requirements

 

Core

Principles of Health Science provides knowledge and skills students need for careers in health care. Students explore the services, structure, and professions of the health care system and get guidance on choosing a specific career path in health services, including career paths in emergency medicine, nutrition, and alternative medicine.

Students focus on day-to-day skills and expectations for health professionals, which include promoting wellness, maintaining a safe environment, creating medical records, and practicing good communication, collaboration, and leadership. In addition, students will expand their understanding of health and safety systems, how to address emergency situations, and deal with infection control issues. Students will also explore topics in medical science, terminology, procedures, and regulations - including an overview of physiology and medical measurements.

Using real-life scenarios and application-driven activities, students learn the responsibilities and challenges of being health care professionals and deepen their knowledge of various career options. In addition to building their understanding of technical concepts and skills, students evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers and develop personal career plans to pursue work in the health care industry and extend their knowledge of oral and written communication in health science.

Principles of Health Science is a full-year Career and Technical Education course for programs of study in health sciences. This course is aligned with state and national standards.

 

 

LEGAL ENVIORNMENT OF BUSINESS

(Grades 9-12) (1 year) (10 Credits)

 

Core

Legal Environment of Business examines the role of the law on all aspects of business ownership and management. Throughout the course, students focus on legal ethics, court procedures, torts, contracts, consumer law, property law, employment law, environmental law, and international law. Students also explore the impact of laws, regulations, and judicial decisions on society at large.

This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will prepare legal documents, create a compliance plan, and research consumer protection issues. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities of interest to them.

Legal Environment of Business is a full-year intermediate or capstone Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in the Business, Management and Administration career cluster. This course is built to state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue certifications such as Accredited Legal Professional, Certified Administrative Manager, or Certified Associate in Project Management®.

HUMAN RESOURCES PRINCIPLES

(Grades 9-12) (1 year) (10 Credits)

 

Core

Human Resources Principles examines the main functions of human resources management, including planning, recruitment, selection, training, development, compensation, and evaluation. In so doing, the course provides students with the tools to hire, manage, and fire employees. Students will also explore the unique role of human resources in the larger organization.

This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create a recruiting plan, develop a strategy to promote a positive organizational culture, and analyze the impact of globalization on the human resources. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities of interest to them.

Human Resources Principles is a full-year intermediate or capstone Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in the Business, Management and Administration career cluster. This course is built to state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue certifications such as Associate Professional in Human ResourcesTM, Certified Administrative Manager, or Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)®.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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